• Egypt Wreck diving
  • Egypt Wreck diving
  • Egypt Wreck diving
  • Egypt Wreck diving
  • Egypt Wreck diving
  • Egypt Wreck diving
  • Egypt Wreck diving
  • Egypt Wreck diving
  • Egypt Wreck diving

Egypt Wreck Diving information tours, prices and online booking

Egypt Wreck diving features many sites in Hurghada, Sharm, Safaga, and Marsa Alam. In fact, Egypt Wreck diving include the Ship Graveyard of Abu Nuhas. The diving site is only an hour away by boat from El Gouna, Egypt. The diving in the site indeed is a fascinating experience. In fact, it is since this submerged reef caused the sinking of no less than 5 ships. This is why the reef called this name. In fact, the site name means “father of bad luck reef” since it considered as a sailor’s nightmare. The diving site features four of the sunken ships which can explored by divers. In fact, the sunken ships are the Giannis D which built as cargo ship and sunk in 1983.

Moreover, the site also houses the Carnatic which was British cargo and mail ship. Furthermore, the diving site also houses The Chrisoula K which sunk in 1981. The last one is Kimon M which was a German cargo and sunk in 1978. Egypt Wreck Diving sites also include the “Excalibur” which lies in fact a few meters from shore, inside Hurghada’s harbor. The wreckage of the Excalibur, also referred to as the Suzanna. In fact, the site is an easy dive for all levels of divers. It can even accessed from shore but boat trips are also organized to reach the site. The Excalibur ship is a 22-meter long twin mast motor. It sank in 1995 for undetermined reasons. In fact, a fire broke out in its main section a short time before it sank. Today, you’ll find it resting on the sea bed in an upright position.

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Some of the shipwrecks which rest at the bottom of the Red Sea, intentionally sank to their current positions. In fact, it is to reduce the diving frenzy’s impact on the most frequently explored diving sites. This is the case, among others, of the Egyptian 44-meter long cargo ship Hebatallah. The ship bought from its owner after being abandoned for many years on a reef it drifted on after its moorings broke down. In fact, it was In 2004 thanks to the joint efforts of the Red Sea Diving Association. One of the most interesting ship wrecks to explore in the Red Sea is undeniably the 108 m long Rosalie Moller coal ship. In fact, the ship bombed by the German air force in October 1941 as it was transporting coal to Alexandria.

The wreck is surprisingly intact today, with some areas covered with hard and soft corals. The shipwreck in fact lies at a depth of 39 to 50 meters. The ship’s mast can be spotted from as low as 17 meters. Located south of Marsa Alam, the Hamada Shipwreck site can accessed by boat from Marsa Alam. In fact, it also included on many live aboard trails, especially those exploring the southernmost diving sites of the Red Sea in Egypt. The Hamada is a 65 meter-long cargo ship that sank in 1993, after a fire broke out on board. Divers explored it for the first time in 1995, and only then they discover that the damage caused by the proclaimed fire was not as tragic as expected. Most of the wreck lies today at 14 meters of depth at the “Abu-Gosoon reef.”

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Built in 1966 as a Roll On/Roll Off PAX-ferry named the Ulster Queen, this ship could carry 1,008 passengers and 140 automobiles. It served as a P & O Ferry and then sold and renamed 3 times before it dubbed the Poseidonia. It traveled the Northern Mediterranean until 2005, when it transferred to the Red Sea and renamed for the last time. The newly dubbed Al Kahfain took its last voyage in November of the same year. On its way from Hurghada, an explosion took place in the engine room leading to a fast spreading fire. The crew (there were no passengers on board) abandoned ship and rescued. Sadly, one life lost. While Al Kahfain towed back to port it capsized and drifted into a reef.

Moreover, it sank at around 25 meters and resting almost upside down on its starboard side. The hull split and the wreck is still slowly collapsing, sometimes making audible creaking and grinding sounds. On a sunny day in late November 2001, the Egyptian-built live aboard “MV Hatour” was on its way to meet another diving boat at the Abu Kafan diving site. Sadly, it hit the southern side of the reef and began to take on water. Luckily enough it towed to shallower waters atop Sha’ab Sheer – also known as Hyndman Reef. At this point, all passengers salvaged and the boat sank to the depth it rests at today. In fact, it is 16 meters on the south-eastern side of the reef.

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Egypt Wreck diving also include the wreck of the Agia Varvara. in fact, the shipwreck located a little to the North of Sharm El Sheikh. The word Agia pronounced with a silent “g”, which led to some confusion surrounding the ship’s name. Built in France, the ship had many names before finally re-named Agia Varvara in 1974. The vessel has three cargo holds in spite of its compact size. It owned by a Cypriot company when it went below. Its final voyage began on the 27th of June in 1976.  It travelled from the Jordanian port of Aqaba towards the Suez Canal in the early morning. Moreover, it collided with a reef not far from Nabq. Luckily the crew rescued but the ship went down.

Known simply as the Barge at Bluff point, this is what remains of a ship with an identity that is lost. There are several theories about its origin, but none confirmed. The wreck sustained quite a bit of damage but it makes an awesome night dive. It located on the East of the Big Gubal Island, which is a wonderful dive sight in its own right, just 10 minutes away. The Barge covered in hard and soft corals and it is home to breathtaking marine life. This includes several giant morays, nudibranchs and large numbers of lionfish. Bluff Point itself is interesting as a wall dive. You will see hoards of glassfish as well as octopi, squid, crocodile fish, scorpion fish, and butterfly fish. Furthermore, turtles known to make an appearance.

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The Dunraven is one of the best-known wreck dives in the Red Sea, second only to the famous Thistlegorm. Lying upside-down, broken in two, at a depth of 20 meters today, the wreck was once an English steam ship transporting spices, timber and gold from India. It hit the reef and sank in April 1876. The freighter’s content was removed by a team of archaeologists in the 80s. The site can be reached by boat; a permanent buoy marks the location of the ship. Although you have to be an experienced diver to be allowed to go for the Dunraven dive, the whole gig is similar to an easy cave exploration. Inside, divers usually encounter yellow goat fish and giant morays while outside, the ship’s hull encrusted with corals.

Shag Rock refers to two reefs located on the south-western side of the Sinai Peninsula tip. It can accessed by boat from Sharm El Sheikh. It also listed on most of the live-aboard and diving safari tours in the Red Sea. The site holds its name after the numerous shags, or cormorants which were frequent visitors of the reefs. Divers usually prefer to dive the southern reef along its east side. The site in fact houses amazing hard and soft coral formations. Moreover, the site is also full of pelagic. There are also sea cucumbers, sweetlips and butterfly fish. In the northern part of Shag Rock lies the 18th century steamship boat Carina in only 10 meters of water.

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Egypt Wreck diving sites also include the SS Thistlegorm shipwreck. In fact, it was in the early fifties by the French diver Jacques Cousteau. It is about 10 years after the British ship sunk, in 1941, by a German air force bombing. Following the instructions of the local fishermen, Cousteau succeeded in locating the wreck. He also raised several items from it including a motorcycle, the Captain’s safe, and the ship’s bell. Diving around the wreckship today is like traveling through time. It is for many an emotional experience. In fact, the site is after all a bombing site and a war grave.

Egypt Wreck Diving Sites:

Agia Varvara shipwreck
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Al Kahfain Shipwreck Safaga
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Brothers Islands Hurghada
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Carnatic Wreck Hurghada
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Dunraven Shipwreck Egypt
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