• Other Islamic Egypt
  • Other Islamic Egypt
  • Other Islamic Egypt
  • Other Islamic Egypt
  • Other Islamic Egypt
  • Other Islamic Egypt
  • Other Islamic Egypt
  • Other Islamic Egypt
  • Other Islamic Egypt
  • Other Islamic Egypt

Other Islamic Egypt information, tours, prices and online booking

Other Islamic Egypt includes in fact other Islamic sites. At first sight, Agha Khan Mausoleum in Aswan appears as an austere and isolated building. In fact, it located on the west bank of the Nile River. It in fact inspired by the architecture of the Cairo Fatimids. Moreover, the structure recognizable by its elegance and by its special use of pink granite. It built at the request of the begum, wife of the Aga Khan III who died in 1957. The begum – who died in 2000 – lived in the white villa below. She closed the mausoleum to the public in 1997. In fact, it was to allow the deceased to rest in peace away from the bustle of the living. Nevertheless, the spot is more than worth a visit, be it for the serenity of the place or the amazing panoramas of the Nile and the villa below.

Other Islamic Egypt also includes the Funerary complex of Al-Malek Al-Salih Najm al-Din Ayyub. In fact, it located on the famous Moezz Street in Cairo. Moreover, it dates back to the mid-13th century. Named after its builder, the Ayyubid ruler who reigned over Egypt from 1240 till 1249. In fact, it was the first complex to be built in what became a typical Mamluk style. Moreover, a tomb linked up to a “Madrassa”(a theological school). Way back in the Mamluk period, the building played the role of a courthouse. It is where religious judges, referred to as “qadi” heard cases that were referred to them from lower tribunals. The “Madrassa” consists of two wings, each of which contains a courtyard and two “Iwans”. The iwans, a total of four served as study areas for the four schools of Sunni Islamic law.

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Students lived in the units that are located on the periphery of the courtyards. In fact, this complex was the first to house a school teaching Islamic law in all of its four versions. Sultan Qansuh Al-Ghouri was a Mamluk sultan, who had reigned from 1501 to 1516. In fact, it was before dying in a battle against the Ottomans in Aleppo. It resulted in a complete defeat for the Mamluks, due to which they lost their prominence in Egypt. Al-Ghouri spent a fortune on building his complex in Cairo which dates back to 1503. In fact, he renowned for his cruelty and despotism. Moreover, he was known for his love of flowers, music, poetry and architecture. Furthermore, his cultural refinement emanates from the different features of the complex.

Other Islamic Egypt also includes the Gate of Conquest or Bab Al-Futuh. In fact, it is the northernmost of the three remaining old gates of Cairo. Moreover, it once served as the northern entrance to the city. Like those of Bab Zuweila, the towers of Bab Al-Futuh are round and beautifully decorated. Moreover they dotted with arrow slits and openings for the pouring of boiling liquids on encroaching enemies. The gates of Cairo mark the beginning of stone masonry in Cairo. In fact, they built in the Fatimid era borrowing from Byzantine architecture. Bab Al-Futuh is short walk to the west of Bab Al-Nasr and close to Al-Hakim Mosque. Meaning Gate of victory, Bab Al-Nasr is one of Cairo’s old gates. In fact, it built in 1087 and served as one of the northern gates to the Fatimid Cairo.

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Moreover, the two towers of Bab Al-Nasr are rectangular in shape. Furthermore, you can see some Byzantine influence in their architecture. The cylindrical towers of Bab El Nasr are not the same like Bab Zuweila and Bab Al-Futuh. Many of the stones used to erect these gates taken from Pharaonic monuments. Moreover, if you look closely enough you might even spot some hieroglyphs. The design of all Cairo gates shows true military intelligence. Moreover, in these gates you’ll observe passages and look outs used by the Fatimid soldiers. Upon Napoleon’s conquest of Cairo, his troops used Bab Al-Nasr as protection from defiant Cairenes. In fact, the names of some of those French officers still seen. They in fact carved into the stone of the gates.

Other Islamic Egypt also include Bab Zuweila which is a stunning example of Fatimid architecture. In fact, it marks the southernmost end of the old Fatimid city. The gate has two beautifully adorned minarets belonging to the nearby Al-Mu’ayyad mosque. In fact,  they are open to visitors. Once you ascend the steep steps, you will lay your eyes on one of the best views to the end of Old Cairo. The gate also shares a wall with the mosque and is a must-see sight in Islamic Cairo. Located on Al-Mo’ez Street in Cairo, the Qalawun Complex. In fact, it built by the Mamluk Sultan Al-Nassir in 1304 AD in honor of his father Qalawun.

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The complex houses a mosque, a Madrasa, a Bimaristan and a mausoleum where Sultan Qalawun is buried.
It often described as the world’s second most beautiful mausoleum in the world. In fact, it is only after the Taj Mahal, which it slightly resembles. A rather “recent” landmark stands tucked in between the old Mamluk mosques and buildings on Saliba Street in Cairo. It is Sabil-Kuttab Umm Abbas, a fountain which built in the mid-19th century by the mother of Abbas II. In fact, he was last Khedive of Egypt who ruled the country from 1892 to 1914. You can easily find the fountain by walking down the Saliba Street. It is from Midan Salah El-Din until you reach the intersection with Al-Souyoufiya Street.

At the intersection, turn right and look out for a half-hexagonal façade. In fact, it boasts three beautifully carved windows on each edge. The structure topped by a gold-plated engraved ceiling adding to the grandeur of the monument. In fact, Sultan Ashraf Barsbay ruled for approximately 15 years. Moreover, he completed this religious complex around the year 1425. The complex located to the North of Khan El-Khalili. The Sultan’s other complex located in Souq El Nahassin (Market of the Coppersmiths). The madrassa (school) provided a place for students of Islam to study. In fact, ten of these students lived on the complex in the rooms provided. This complex shows elements such as the prayer hall that are unusual to its period.

Other Islamic Egypt sites:

Aga Khan Mausoleum Aswan
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Egypt Nile cruises and hotels
Al Ashraf Barsbay complex
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Al Ghouri complex Cairo
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Al Salih Ayyub Complex
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Al Zahir Barquq Mausoleum
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Bab Al Futuh Cairo Egypt
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